Parks, gardens and nature

Bonnington Square Garden

A delightful play space for the kids and something of a sanctuary from the big city storm for the adults. It is one of the beating ‘hearts’ of our community and a place of pilgrimage for many more.

The wheel at the end of the garden, is a classic piece of Industrial Revolution Art dating from the 1860’s. It was rescued from a nearby marble factory (under demolition as we were constructing) where it was used to ‘wet cut’ marble. Legend has it that once a year the wheel turns, bringing forth beautiful, crystal clear champagne from the worlds below…a delightful fishing boat that floated above the pergola on a sea of wisteria set sail one midnight eve ne’er to be seen again – but only ever for believers.

Bonnington Square, Kennington, SW8 1GA
Every day, all day
It is wheelchair accessible
Brompton Cemetery

Brompton Cemetery, one of London’s Magnificent Seven historic cemeteries, is a magical place, combining historic monuments, trees and wildlife with the stories of the remarkable people buried here. It is designated Grade I on English Heritage’s Register of Parks and Gardens.

This beautiful landscape is the only Cemetery in the country owned by the Crown and managed by The Royal Parks on behalf of the nation.

Fulham Road, London SW10 9UG
Everyday – Summer: 8am – 8pm / Winter: 8am – 4pm
It is accessible for wheelchair users
020 7352 1201
Bunhill Fields

Bunhill Fields burial ground is located in the London Borough of Islington but is owned and maintained by the City of London.

The 1.6 hectares of Bunhill Fields are an oasis of calm and greenery in a busy, congested locality just north of the City of London’s square mile, which has been managed as a public open space by the City of London since 1867.

 

38 City Road, London EC1Y 1AU
October – March: Monday – Friday, 7.30am – 4pm, Saturday – Sunday, 9.30am – 4pm / April – September: Monday – Friday, 7.30am – 7pm, Saturday – Sunday, 9.30am – 7pm
It is wheelchair accessible
020 7374 4127
Camley Street Natural Park

Two unique acres of wild green space right in the heart of London, this innovative and internationally acclaimed reserve on the banks of the Regent’s Canal is a place for both people and wildlife.

Camley Street Natural Park was created from an old coal yard back in 1984. It sits in the middle of King’s Cross, alongside the sparkling new Eurostar station at St Pancras

It is popular with all kinds of people seeking respite from the buzz of the city around them, as well as being a hub for London Wildlife Trust volunteers. Individuals are welcome to drop in during opening hours.

The reserve has a visitor centre and provides natural habitat for birds, butterflies, amphibians and a rich variety of plant life.

http://www.wildlondon.org.uk/
12 Camley Street, N1C 4PW
Monday – Sunday, 10am – 5pm
It is wheelchair accessible
020 7833 2311
Centre for Wildlife Gardening

An idyllic garden within a quiet residential street, the centre has an award-winning visitor centre offering practical advice to city gardeners. It’s the perfect place to both learn and relax, and our new nature trail is great for kids.

A favourite place to visit for local families, gardeners and wildlife watchers from further afield, the Centre for Wildlife Gardening in Peckham has developed beyond all recognition over the last 25 years.

It was originally an old council depot, but it is now home to an award-winning visitors’ centre demonstrating innovative environmental building techniques, which provides a base for school parties.

The centre also has a demonstration wildlife garden with a range of inspiring mini habitats, a wild flower nursery, and some very well-used community raised beds.

You can pick up some plants from our stall, not to mention a pot of Peckham honey from our very own hives – delicious.

28 Marsden Road, London SE15
Tuesday – Thursday and Sunday, 10.30am – 4.30pm
It is wheelchair accessible
020 7252 9186
Chelsea Physic Garden

Tucked away beside the Thames, Chelsea Physic Garden is a celebration of the beauty and importance of plants.

This walled Garden was founded in 1673 by the Worshipful  Society of Apothecaries for its apprentices to study the medicinal qualities of plants and it became one of the most important centres of botany and plant exchange in the world.

Today, as an independent charity the Garden relies on the support of visitors and Friends to help protect and nurture the Garden for future generations.

http://chelseaphysicgarden.co.uk/
66 Royal Hospital Road, Chelsea, London SW3 4HS
April – October: Wednesday – Friday, 12pm – 5pm, Sunday 12pm – 6pm
It is wheelchair accessible
020 7352 5646
Chumleigh Gardens

A few years ago, the grounds surrounding the attractive former almhouses were transformed into a delightful world garden. As well as a striking squeare blue tiled mosaic pond, you will find Middle Eastern, African and Mediterranean plants in raised beds and shady corners.

The park was named after Councillor Jessie Burgess, Camberwell’s first woman mayor and has some magnificent flowering trees as well as an old lime kiln nearby.

Unfortunatly, the cafe plays music but there are plenty of tables and benches to sit outside on sunny days.

Chumleigh Street, Burgess Park, Kennington SE5 0RJ
Monday – Friday, 9am – 5pm, Saturday and Sunday, 10am – 5pm
It is wheelchair accessible
020 7525 1070
Clifton Kitchen

Coming here is a rare opportunity to buy plants without having to listen to non-stop muzak. After enjoying a piece of beetroot and seed cake, stock up on burnt orange sneezeweed or Echicacea with deep pink daisy petals.

Its a treat to be surrounded by a vast array of growing things.

http://www.clifton.co.uk/
5A Clifton Villas, London W9 2PH
Monday – Saturday 9am – 6pm, Sunday 11am – 5pm
It is wheelchair accessible
020 7432 1867
College Garden

College garden occupies a site that has been under continuous cultivation for more than 900 years. It was here that the Abbey’s first Infirmary garden was established in the eleventh-century. The Infirmarer, a senior monk of the Abbey, had care of the sick and elderly members of the monastic community as well as administering a dispensary for local people. He would have directed the planting and cultivation of the various herbs needed for medicinal purposes in the Infirmary. Some of these herbs, such as rosemary and fennel, are still grown in the garden today.

While the original garden was principally an area in which to grow herbs, fruit and vegetables, it also gave the convalescing monks a place in the open air for relaxation and gentle exercise. Today, the garden still offers a tranquil space for the residents and staff at the Abbey. It has been open to the public for a relatively short period of its history.

Westminster Abbey, 20 Dean’s Yard, London SW1P 3PA
Tuesday – Thursday, winter 10am – 4pm / summer 10am – 6pm
It is wheelchair accessible
020 7222 5152
Culpeper Community Garden

A green oasis in the midst of streets, estates and inner city bustle, Culpeper Community Garden is one of the most valued and verdant public spaces in Islington

Culpeper Community Garden is a beautiful public open space in the heart of Islington, London, which serves both as a city park and as an environmental community project. Managed by and for local people, it is a unique project where people from all walks of life come together to appreciate and enhance their environment.

Surrounded by roads and a busy shopping area, Culpeper is often described as ‘an oasis’. Children and adults alike love to explore the pathways, ponds and wealth of plants. It’s a perfect place for a picnic or simply for relaxing.

http://www.culpeper.org.uk/
1 Cloudesley Road, Islington London N1 0EG
Tuesday – Sunday, 10am – 4pm
It is wheelchair accessible
020 7833 3951